Archive for the ‘Blogs’ Category

In search of familiarity

Ask someone what they do, and they’ll probably talk about where they work. “I work in insurance,” or even, “I work for Aetna.” Of course, most of the 47,000 people who work for Aetna don’t do anything that’s specifically insurance-y. They do security for Building 7, or they answer the phone for someone, or they work in the graphic design department.

Predicting or inventing…

The most common way to deal with the future is to try to predict it. To be in the right place at the right time with the right skills or investments. A far more successful and generico para zithromax reliable approach is to invent the future. Not all of it, just a little part. But enough to make a difference

Microcopy in the age of the glance

People rarely read to the end. And they almost never spend as much time reading your words as you spend writing them. Which makes it ironic that the little phrases we use (in designing a simple form, or when we answer the phone) matter so much. Being gentle, kind or human goes a long way.

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“What about endogeneity?”

Ask this question often. Several times a day, at least. Endogeneity is a fancy term for confusing cause and effect. For not being clear about causation and correlation. It’s one reason why smart people make so many mistakes

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Lowering the bar

Raymond Loewy coined the term MAYA to describe Most Advanced Yet Acceptable when it came to futuristic design. The thinking goes that people (the amorphous term for the lumpen masses) won’t accept something too advanced, so we ought to lower our standards to gain acceptance. But mass acceptance isn’t nearly as important as it used to be. Pockets of commitment and enthusiasm are more important than being tolerated or even accepted by the disinterested masses. Our hunch is that we need to average things down if we don’t want to be rejected, that we need to offer a bit less if we’re hoping to make change happen

Facts are not the antidote for doubt

Drink enough water and you will cease to be thirsty. And yet, a doubting person can be drowning in facts, but facts won’t change a mind that doesn’t want to be changed. More facts don’t counter more doubt. Someone who is shaking her head, arms folded, eyes squinted and ears closed isn’t going to be swayed by more facts. Instead, doubt surrenders to experience.

Choosing your fuel

The work is difficult. Overcoming obstacles, facing rejection, exploring the unknown–many of us need a narrative to fuel our forward motion, something to keep us insisting on the next cycle, on better results, on doing work that matters even more.

Just words

How about, just bullets, just diseases, just starvation? The whole “sticks and stones” canard is really dangerous. When a stone gives you a bruise, it’s entirely possible you will completely heal. But when a torrent of words undermine your view of what’s possible, you might never recover. Words matter

Say one thing at a time

I know, you might not get the microphone back for a while. And I know, you want to make sure everyone understands precisely what went into your thinking. Not to mention your desire to make sure that everyone who hears you hears something that they’d like to hear. But if you try to say three things, we will hear nothing. Because most of the time, we’re hardly listening

Three ways to add value

Tasks, decisions, and initiation… Doing, choosing, and starting…

Emotional labor

That’s the labor most of us do now. The work of doing what we don’t necessarily feel like doing, the work of being a professional, the work of engaging with others in a way that leads to the best long-term outcome. The emotional labor of listening when we’d rather yell. The emotional labor of working with someone instead of firing them. The emotional labor of seeking out facts and viagra generic canada insights that we don’t (yet) agree with

What Henry Ford understood about wages

Every time Ford increased the productivity of car production (in one three-year period, he lowered labor costs by 66% per car), he also raised wages. Not merely because it’s the right thing to do. He did it because well-paid workers had more to spend. On houses, on clothes, and of course, on cars. There’s a positive ratchet here.

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