Posts Tagged ‘children’

    FCC Releases Draft AM Revitalization Order to Simplify Proofs of Performance

    Last week, the FCC released a draft of an order to simplify the proofing of AM stations . This order will be considered at the FCC’s September 26 meeting. While the proposals to be adopted are part of the AM Revitalization proceeding, even the Commission recognizes that these are not fundamental changes in the way that stations operate, but instead technical changes that can, hopefully, save some AM stations some money. The FCC also noted that it was removing proposals for changes in the AM main studio rules from the AM Revitalization proceeding as these changes are already being considered in the proceeding proposing to entirely eliminate the main studio rules (see our post here ).

    Washington Issues for TV Broadcasters – Where Things Stand at the FCC

    There is never a shortage of Washington issues for broadcasters to consider, and the rapid pace of change since the new administration took over in January has made it even more difficult to track where all the issues stand. While we try on this Blog to write about many of the DC issues for broadcasters, we can’t always address everything that is happening. Every few months, my partner David O’Connor and I update a list of the legal and regulatory issues facing TV broadcasters . That list of issues is published by TVNewsCheck and the latest version, published last week, is available on their website, here

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    Ask Billboard: Kelly Clarkson’s Career Sales & ‘Wild Thoughts’ About Rihanna

    Submit questions about Billboard charts, as well as general music musings, to askbb@billboard.com. Please include your first and last name, as well…

    FCC Issues Guidance for Broadcasters and Other Regulated Services in the Path of Hurricane Irma

    The FCC has issued a series of public notices to broadcasters and other FCC regulated entities in the path of Hurricane Irma. General guidance was issued by the FCC, here , discussing how stations can get special temporary authority to operate with facilities different than those specified in their licenses by email or even by telephone during the emergency. This may be particularly important if stations towers or antennas are damaged by the storm and, to continue service, stations need to use alternate facilities. During the recent Texas Hurricane harvey, the FCC even issued some daytime only AM stations authority to temporarily operate with nighttime operations where they were providing emergency information. If STAs are needed, the public notice provides information about where to call or email The FCC has also activated its Disaster Information Reporting System for the Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico , and is likely to extend it to portions of Florida in the near future

    More on Media Deregulation – Chairman Pai Speaks to NAB Radio Show and Promises to Propose the Repeal of a Rule Each Month

    FCC Chairman Ajit Pai spoke on Wednesday at the opening lunch at the NAB Radio Show in Austin, promising more moves to bring media regulation in line with the realities of the modern media marketplace. In his speech, the text of which is available here , the Chairman promised several actions including the following: A monthly Notice of Proposed Rulemaking suggesting a media rule change prompted by suggestions made in the Modernization of Media Regulation proceeding we wrote about here and here . The first proposal for deregulation coming for the September FCC meeting is a modest one, probably chosen as symbolic of the rules that are outdated and unnecessary – the proposal being to eliminate the rule that requires that a broadcaster have a hard copy of the FCC rules at their station. While not a rule that is ever enforced, it is still notable in that the proposal is being advanced only about a month after the end of the comment period on Media Modernization and illustrates a rule that clearly is unnecessary in a day when any broadcaster can access any FCC rule at any time via the Internet. The Chairman stated that he had reviewed the comments in the proceeding to abolish the rules requiring main studios for all broadcast stations, and he concluded that these rules were no longer necessary and would be presenting an Order to implement their abolition before the end of the year.

    FCC Regulatory Fees Due By September 26

    The FCC late yesterday released an Order setting the amount of FY2017 Annual Regulatory fees, along with a public notice setting September 26 as the deadline for those fees. Reg fees may be paid now through September 26. If not paid by 11:59 PM Eastern Time on that date, penalties of 25% will be assessed. In addition, applications by any licensee that has not paid its fees may be held by the Commission without action until the fees are paid, and can even end up resulting in a license cancellation in cases where the failure is a long-term unresolved issue. The public notice also makes clear that fees can only be paid by electronic transfer of funds.

    More and More Actions on Pirate Radio – What is Next?

    It seems like virtually every day, the FCC announces that it has sent numerous Notices to pirate radio operators warning them that their operations are illegal and that, if the operations do not cease, legal penalties may follow. Yesterday, the FCC released ten such Notices, including ones sent to operators of pirate radio stations themselves (see notices here and here ) and to the owners of buildings in which pirate radio operations have been tracked (see notices here and here ). These Notices have been common over the past several months, seemingly signaling a new focus on pirate radio operations by the FCC’s Enforcement Bureau

    Effective Date for Elimination of Last Remnant of Rule on Keeping Correspondence in Broadcast Public Inspection File

    Earlier this year, the FCC eliminated the requirement that broadcasters maintain, in their public inspection files, copies of letters from the public about station operations (see our article summarizing that action here ). One aspect of that rule change did not become immediately effective, as it was subject to review by the Office of Management and Budget under the Paperwork Reduction Act, was the elimination of the requirement that television broadcasters report, in their license renewal applications, about letters complaining about violent television programming. The elimination of that requirement is scheduled to be published in the Federal Register tomorrow , and that will trigger the effective date of that part of the rule change – making that total elimination of all obligations to retain letters from the public in the public inspection file.

    September Regulatory Dates for Broadcasters – Including Reg Fees, Nationwide EAS Test, Must-Carry Letters, Lowest Unit Rate, Translator and Repack…

    Summer is coming to an end, but the legal obligations never take a vacation, and September brings another list of regulatory deadlines for broadcasters. While the month is one of those without the usual list of EEO Public File obligations or quarterly FCC filing obligations, there still are a number of other regulatory deadlines for which broadcasters need to be prepared. For commercial broadcasters, the September date that should be on everyone’s mind is the deadline for the payment of annual regulatory fees . As we wrote here , there is an FCC order circulating among the Commissioners that should be released any day, setting the amounts of the regulatory fees and the deadline for their payment

    Reminder – ETRS Form One to be Filed by August 27 By All EAS Participants – Including Broadcasters – In Anticipation of September Nationwide EAS…

    All EAS Participants – including all full-power broadcasters – must complete the 2017 ETRS Form One on or before August 28, 2017.  We wrote about this obligation here . The filing deadline was set for next week as the ETRS system is used so that stations can report on the results of nationwide EAS tests. With the next Nationwide EAS Test set for September 27 , the accounts and basic information for all EAS participants need to be in the system to allow for that reporting.

    Complaints Filed Against TV Stations for Public File Violations on Political Issue Ads

    Earlier this week, the Campaign Legal Center and Issue One, two political “watchdog” organizations, filed FCC complaints against two Georgia TV stations, alleging violations of the rules that govern the documents that need to be placed into a station’s public inspection file regarding political “issue advertising” (see their press release here , with links to the complaints at the bottom of the release). FCC rules require that stations place into their public files information concerning any advertising dealing with controversial issues of public importance including the list of the sponsoring organization’s chief executive officers or directors. Section 315 of the Communications Act requires that, when those issues are “matters of national importance,” the station must put into their public file additional information similar to the information that they include in their file for candidate ads, including the specifics of the schedule for the ads including price information and an identification of the issue to which the ad is directed. The complaints allege that, while the stations included this additional information in their public file, the form that was in the public file stated that the sponsors of the ads did not consider the issues to be ads that addressed a matter of national importance, despite the fact that they addressed candidates involved in the recent highly contested election for an open Congressional seat in the Atlanta suburbs.

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