Posts Tagged ‘design’

    FCC Appoints Regional Coordinators for TV Post-Auction Repacking Process

    With the FCC last week announcing the results of the reverse auction portion of the incentive auction and setting the timetable for the repacking of the TV spectrum , the next question on everyone’s mind will be how successful the television industry will be in adhering to the schedule established by the FCC for clearing the TV spectrum above Channel 37. The FCC yesterday released a Public Notice showing how it will be doing its part to monitor and assist in that repacking. The FCC announced that it is appointing 10 Commission employees to serve as “Regional Coordinators” to help ensure a “smooth and efficient post-auction transition.” These coordinators will each have a geographic region to which they are assigned

    FCC Changes in Rules on Computation of Foreign Ownership of Broadcast Stations Now Effective

    Last year, the FCC made some modifications in its assessment of foreign ownership of companies with broadcast interests, relaxing some of their compliance rules to take account of the realities of the current public stock trading marketplace – realities that, using the FCC’s old policies, made determinations of the level of foreign ownership in any company difficult. We wrote about the changes made by the FCC here . Those rules became effective yesterday, when the approval of the changes by the Office of Management and Budget under the Paperwork Reduction Act was published in the Federal Register . As we wrote here , the FCC has already referred to these new rules in assessing and approving broadcast ownership in excess of 25% of several broadcast companies

    FCC to Eliminate Need for Social Security Numbers from Board Members of Noncommercial Licensees for Biennial Ownership Report

    Last week, we wrote about two of the three broadcast items to be considered at the FCC meeting on April 20. We wrote here about the draft order to restore the UHF discount, and here about the relaxation of the restrictions on fund-raising for third parties by noncommercial stations. The third item, also related to noncommercial licensees, is the resolution of the long-simmering dispute about whether or not to require that those individuals with attributable interests in noncommercial broadcast stations – officers and board members – to provide their Social Security Numbers or other personal information to the FCC to obtain an FCC Registration Number – an FRN .

    New Congressional Attempts to Impose a Performance Royalty for Sound Recordings on Broadcast Radio, Including the PROMOTE Act – What Do They…

    In the last month, there have been two bills introduced in the US House of Representatives seeking to impose a performance royalty for sound recordings on broadcast radio stations in the US. The bill introduced yesterday, The PROMOTE Act (standing for the Performance Royalty Owners of Music Opportunity to Earn Act – whatever that may mean, can be found here ), seems to have garnered more attention, perhaps as it was promoted by its principal sponsor, California Congressman Darrell Issa, as giving performing artists the right to decide whether or not their music is played by radio stations. In fact, it does not do that, instead merely setting up a royalty system similar to that in place for Internet radio operators, allowing broadcasters to play music only if they pay royalties on “identical” rates and terms as do webcasters. The PROMOTE Act proposes to add to the Copyright Act’s Section 106 enumeration of the “exclusive rights” given to copyright holders a provision stating that sound recording copyright holders (for most popular releases, that is usually the record company) have the exclusive right to authorize the performance of recorded songs by broadcast radio stations. That is in addition to the existing right to authorize the playing of these songs by digital audio transmissions (e.g.

    FCC Releases Draft Order to Reinstate UHF Discount at April 20 Meeting – A New Round of TV Consolidation? 

    The FCC yesterday released the agenda for its April 20 th meeting – and it includes three broadcast items.  Two deal with noncommercial broadcasters (undoing the requirement for noncommercial broadcasters to get Social Security Numbers from its board members so that they can acquire an FCC Registration Number for them – see our articles here and here on this issue – and one allowing noncommercial broadcasters to interrupt programming to raise funds for unrelated non-profit organizations- see our article below ).  But in a decision which, if adopted, will likely have an immediate impact on the market for the purchase and sale of television stations, the FCC released a draft order , to be voted on at the April 20 meeting, proposing to reinstate the UHF discount . That discount, in assessing the broadcaster’s compliance with the 39% cap on the nationwide audience that any broadcaster can reach with TV stations in which it has an attributable interest, accords half the weight to the population of television markets in which a broadcaster holds a UHF station.  The discount was adopted back in the days of analog television, when UHF stations had signals that were harder for most viewers to receive, and the stations were more expensive to operate than VHF stations.  In the digital world, that deficit has disappeared, underlying the September decision of the Commission (which we summarized here ) to abolish the discount.  The September decision did away with the discount, and the Commission had effectively put on hold television transactions that would exceed the cap for several years while considering the September order.  This effectively froze the acquisition of new stations by the major television groups – a freeze that may quickly thaw if the Commission follows through and adopts its draft order on April 20. In the draft order released yesterday (as well as in Chairman Pai’s dissent in September), the fact that the discount was in place when the 39% cap was initially adopted was central.  The decision looks at the history of the national audience cap, and concludes that every time the cap was considered, the fact that there was a UHF discount was also recognized.  Thus, the decision reasons that the discount can only be changed in the context of an overall review of the 39% cap, a review not done in reaching the September decision. So the Commission apparently plans to reinstate the discount, and to undertake the review of the national audience cap at some point later this year.  Theoretically, after this review of the national cap, the FCC could come back and reexamine the UHF discount – though in the interim, broadcasters would apparently be free to rely on the discount, potentially allowing some groups to greatly expand their holdings of TV stations

    ASSOCIATE BRAND MANAGER – Sacramento, CA

    Company: un/common Location: Sacramento, California Industry: Advertising – Account Management Career Level: Early Career (1+ yrs experience) Minimum Education: Bachelor’s Job Status: Full Time

    Administrative Executive Assistant – President’s Office – New York City, NY

    Company: CUNY Hunter College Location: New York City, New York Industry: Not Specified Job Status: Full Time

    April Regulatory Dates for Broadcasters – Quarterly Issues Programs Lists and Children’s Television Reports, Incentive Auction Closing Notice, AM…

    April has many important dates for broadcasters – both radio and TV.  This includes both regular regulatory obligations and dates unique to this April for both radio and TV – including the release of the FCC’s Closing Notice for the TV incentive auction and the effective date for the new rules liberalizing the location of FM translators used to rebroadcast AM stations. The regular dates include the requirement for commercial and noncommercial full-power and Class A Television Stations and AM and FM Radio Stations in Delaware, Indiana, Kentucky, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, and Texas that they, by April 1, add to their public file (and upload to their websites for stations that have not yet converted to the FCC’s online public file) their Annual EEO Public File Report if the station is part of an Employment Unit with 5 or more full-time employees.  For Radio Stations in Texas which are part of an employment unit with 11 or more full-time employees; and for Television Employment Units with five or more full-time employees in Indiana, Kentucky, and Tennessee , by April 3 (as April 1 is on the weekend), these stations must file with the FCC their EEO Mid-Term Reports (see our summary of this requirement here ).  The Mid-Term Report includes the last two EEO public file reports for these stations and other information about the station’s EEO program.  This is also the end of a calendar quarter, so all stations, commercial and noncommercial, must place into their public files by April 10 their Quarterly Issues Programs Lists .   These lists set out the issues facing their communities and the programs that the station broadcast in the last quarter to address these issues.  As these lists are the only FCC-required records of how stations serve their local communities through their programming efforts, the FCC has taken these obligations very seriously, and imposed big fines for stations that don’t meet their obligations in a timely fashion.

    Powered by WordPress | Designed by: best suv | Thanks to toyota suv, lexus suv and ford suv
    Facebook Like Button for Dummies Radio, free radio, radio, radio stations, radio, internet radio, radio, online radio, radio, radio news, radio, radio jobs, radio, digital radio, radio, radio engineering, radio, radio programming, radio, radio sales, radio production, radio jobs, radio, radio blogs